24Aug
08/24/2016
Mark Dill

One of the most curious characters among a crazy cast of personalities during the early days of automobiling and motor racing was American John Walter Christie, aka J. Walter or Walter.

Aug.24.2016
2912
19Aug
08/19/2016
Mark Dill

Consuelo Vanderbilt was not directly involved with auto racing, but her brother, William K. Vanderbilt, Jr., was. He founded the Vanderbilt Cup, America's first major auto race, in 1904. Consuelo's story is one of the age-old, sick ego that is at the heart of so much of humanity's woes.
 

Aug.19.2016
2911
13Aug
08/13/2016
Mark Dill

Hugh Fortescue Locke King was a worldly Englishman and wealthy landowner at the turn of the 20th century. That sometimes painful vantage point allowed him to see a troubling truth about the state of his country’s automobile industry.
 

Aug.18.2016
2902
08Aug
08/08/2016
Mark Dill

In 1905 the biggest, most important auto race in the world was the James Gordon Bennett Cup. Bennett, the mercurial Paris editor of the New York Herald, was an avid sportsman enthused by horses, gas balloons, airplanes and race cars. He loved celebrating them in competition and becoming the center of attention by awarding the triumphant with trophies carrying his name.
 

Aug.8.2016
2901
06Aug
08/06/2016
Mark Dill

The support for the nascent automobile industry of early 20th century Indianapolis was evident in the Hoosier capital's major daily newspapers. Here is a December 1907 photo with a substantial cutline concerning the success of a Stoddard-Dayton touring car in an annual Los Angeles-area hill climb.

Aug.6.2016
2898
05Aug
08/05/2016
Mark Dill

One of the most curious cars in the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum is the 1905 Vanderbilt Cup 923.3 cubic inch Premier purpose-built racer commissioned by Carl Fisher. Fisher, the most visionary of the four Speedway founders, was intent on representing America in the international road race.
 

Aug.5.2016
2897
30Jul
07/30/2016
Mark Dill

This is your chance to meet Leigh Lynch. Does the name not ring a bell? How well do you know your Indianapolis Motor Speedway history? We're telling ya, Leigh could stand on it. He won the first major auto race at the Speedway, but also in doing so kicked off the incessant controversy so inextricably woven into the place's history when he was refused his just reward.
 

Jul.30.2016
2894
18Jul
07/18/2016
Mark Dill

A conversation that has stuck with me for several years now is one I had back in 2009 with author Charles Leershen who wrote an entertaining but biased book titled, “Blood and Smoke: A True Tale of Mystery, Mayhem and the Birth of the Indy 500.” It was clear to me that he had been referencing First Super Speedway <

Jul.18.2016
2879
16Jul
07/16/2016
Mark Dill

Digging deeper into the milestone March 18, 1907 automobile parade through Indianapolis you can click thru here for some pretty darn amazing historical information. You'll find an analysis of a couple of original articles which are attached.
 

Jul.16.2016
2877
15Jul
07/15/2016
Mark Dill

Despite two fifth-place finishes in his only appearances in the Indianapolis 500 (1914 & 1916), Barney Oldfield's biggest day at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway was probably May 30, 1910. The events that day were the concluding contests of a Memorial Day weekend American Automobile Association (AAA) race meet.

Jul.15.2016
2876