29Sep
09/29/2016
Mark Dill

The original vision of Carl Fisher for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway was that it would be a multi-purpose facility. A big part of what was happening in those days of the industrial revolution was the emergence of the airplane. Both the automobile and aircraft were marvels of the age - and they shared a lot of the same technology.

Sep.29.2016
2940
27Sep
09/27/2016
Mark Dill

Did you know the Indianapolis Motor Speedway's first air show was the week of June 17, 1910? The team from the Wright Brothers dominated and their star pilot was Walter Brookins who set a new world's altitude record of over a mile in the sky.

Sep.27.2016
2937
26Sep
09/26/2016
Mark Dill

See here a broadside that tells an interesting story behind the very first auto races presented at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, August 1909.

Sep.26.2016
2934
26Sep
09/26/2016
Mark Dill

The Giant's Despair Hill Climb in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania traces its roots back to it inaugural contest in 1906. There have been interruptions and most significantly a hiatus of 33 years when the competition was not organized from 1917 through 1950.

Sep.26.2016
2935
03Sep
09/03/2016
Mark Dill

The greatest American driving talent from the early days of motorsport who did not compete in the Indianapolis 500 was undoubtedly George Robertson. New York city-born in 1884, Robertson was part of the first generation to grow up with the automobile.

Sep.3.2016
2924
31Aug
08/31/2016
Mark Dill

Regionalism in the United States was evident in the early days of the automobile industry. There was the Euro-centric northeast and clusters of factories in “the west,” particularly in Detroit, Indianapolis and scattered around Ohio cities.
 

Aug.31.2016
2919
28Aug
08/28/2016
Mark Dill

This image shows a 15-ton steamroller compacting the graded earth to complete the creation of one of the four nine-degree turns at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The shot was printed in the Indianapolis Star during May 1909. The men seen in the lower right are track Founder Carl Fisher and Director of Contests Ernie Moross.
 

Aug.29.2016
2918
27Aug
08/27/2016
Mark Dill
Aug.27.2016
2917
26Aug
08/26/2016
Mark Dill

Lewis Strang, the first "pole sitter" of the Indianapolis 500 (determined by entry date, not time trial), was America's most successful driver in 1908. He won major road races at Savannah, Lowell and Briarcliff as well as dirt tracks throughout the year. E.R.

Aug.26.2016
2916
25Aug
08/25/2016
Mark Dill

It's easy to think of the brave, talented drivers of long ago as old men because if they survived their careers, that is what they became. Old men. In their day they were daring young studs who tested their limits.

Aug.25.2016
2914