20Oct
10/20/2017
Mark Dill

Easily one of the most impressive race cars - worldwide - of the first decade of the 20th century was known as the "Blitzen Benz." Unfortunately, few of even the most dedicated race fans today have heard of this groundbreaking masterpiece of engineering

Oct.20.2017
3124
17Oct
10/17/2017
Mark Dill

The New York auto show has been an ongoing, international event dating all the way back to 1900. In 1910, the show was divided into two camps. On one side were the companies licensed by George Selden through his Selden Patent claim to having invented the internal combustion engine for cars. These companies were under the umbrella of the American Licensed Manufacturers' Association (ALMA).

Oct.17.2017
3121
22Sep
09/22/2017
Mark Dill

Edgar Apperson and his brother Elmer were partners with Elwood Haynes in an automobile business in the 1890's. They were affiliated with one of the nine cars entered in America's first auto race, the 1895 Chicago Times-Herald race held on Thanksgiving Day. 
 
The car was a Haynes-Apperson, the product of a small business that had been founded in 1894. By 1901 the partnership was dissolved and the Appersons formed the Apperson Automobile Company in Kokomo, Indiana.
 

Sep.22.2017
3108
02Sep
09/02/2017
Mark Dill

Revisionists, unfortunately, have a big role in the early history of national driving champions. Secretaries of the American Automobile Association (AAA) Contest Board most frequently cited for the re-writing of auto racing history are Val Haresnape in the 1920's and Russ Catlin in the 1950's.
 

Sep.2.2017
3096
11Aug
08/11/2017
Mark Dill

Do you know of the 1905 Premier racer Carl Fisher commissioned for Vanderbilt Cup competition that is on display at the IMS Museum? The history of the car has gotten garbled through the decades. For years, the placard in front of it said it was developed for the 1903 Vanderbilt Cup.
 

Aug.11.2017
3082
04Aug
08/04/2017
Mark Dill
Aug.4.2017
3079
30Jun
06/30/2017
Mark Dill

The drama and madness of the first weekend of racing at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in August 1909 hit its zenith of tragedy in the final race of the final day. This was the 300-mile Wheeler-Schebler Trophy when three men died, two of them spectators. The richness of detail in the reporting of the day periscopes into a tumultuous world of danger, bravado, and brutally-earned education.

Jun.30.2017
3065
13May
05/13/2017
Mark Dill

The following is by guest blogger Joel Thorne.

 

(Mr. Thorne is a motorsports expert, journalist, and historian. He most recently co-hosted "Pitlane Radio," a weekly interview format radio show with guests, including some of the greatest names in auto racing, providing insights to experiences driving, managing teams, and marketing the sport.)

 

May.13.2017
3062
21Apr
04/21/2017
Mark Dill

I finally got around to reading this interview with Mario Andretti about the Associated Press' Jenna Fryer's opinion piece concerning Formula One World Champion Fernando Alonso competing in the 2017 Indianapolis 500.

Apr.21.2017
3046
20Apr
04/20/2017
Mark Dill

The first practice days for race cars at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway were wild and weird.

Apr.20.2017
3043